Monday, March 31, 2008

On emotional vs rational triggers...kinda, sorta.

I posted a comment this morning to what should be an interesting discussion on Jon Burg's blog regarding the development of emotional brand connections in social media. Here are a few key quotes from Jon's post:

Social Media Marketing is about harnessing relevance and building trust with an ultimate goal of creating faithful advocacy.

And as any philosophy major will tell you, there are two schools of faith - rational faith and emotional faith.

* Rational faith is the individual's conclusion to place faith in a subject after of a period of inquiry or a faith building experience.

* Emotional faith is the trust one invests based on an emotional connection one feels.

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Key Takeaway: rational faith can be manufactured by participation and transparency. Trust can be built. But emotional faith, generating fiery passion that bubbles over in the social media sphere - that only comes from something truly remarkable.

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Food For Thought: So where does this leave social media marketers? Can we manufacture passion around a dispassionate brand? Is it time that we began focusing less on transparency, and more on authentic passion?
And a clip from my comment:
Can you manufacture passion around a dispassionate brand? No. That feels like the path to premature rejection, not authenticity. Another question that might yield results is, how do we recognize latent passion that can be ignited and serve as the heat source for hot-housing a cult/network?

Once spotted, then the challenge is to focus the spotlight accordingly, stay patient, and remember the wisdom of Duke Ellington: "Words stink up the place."
You can read the whole thing, and any subsequent discussion, here.

1 comment:

Jon Burg said...

Firstly, thanks for sharing. I posted my comments over at the original post, but I wanted to share them here as well.

I would agree that Apple is not manufacturing passion, rather they are creating product that invites passion. My point is this: participating in social media doesn't give your the virality and credibility of a passionate community. You can buy a presence, but you can't buy appeal.

You can buy rational connections - Dell's customer service people are all over social media. But that doesn't give me an emotional reason to go with Dell over stunning specs from HP, or stunning computing from Apple.